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STL 226: Social Studies for Elementary Majors: Citing Sources

Help with citing sources

Citing Sources

The purpose of any citation method is the same, namely,

  • to give credit and appropriately attribute the work of others
  • to assure readers about the accuracy of your facts
  • to show readers the research that informs your work
  • to help readers follow or extend your work (Turabian pp. 135-136).1

It is important to provide complete information about your primary source whether found in a printed source or online. The basic elements to include in a citation for a published print source are: author of the document, title of the document, title of the book if different from the document, name of editor or author of the book, place of publication, publisher, year, and page numbers. The basic elements to include in a citation for an online source are: author of the document, title of the document, title of the website, author or producer of the website, url, date (if given) and date accessed. Various style formats such as Chicago, MLA and APA put these elements in different order using different conventions. See the websites below for further information and examples.

The Chicago Manual of Style is the style most commonly used by professional historians when they write and publish their work. Currently, the NHD Contest Rule Book allow citations in Chicago or MLA Style, but this resource focuses on Chicago Style.

As you complete your research, you should sort your research into primary and secondary sources. For complete definitions of primary and secondary sources, as well a complete set of the Contest Rules, go to www.nhd.org/rules.

Look over this helpful LibGuide on RefWorks before you use it: